Monday, March 25, 2013

Good Friday Holiday Canada - Travel with Insurance



This coming Friday, March 29, 2013, is our annual Good Friday Holiday in Canada. No matter you are planning to go ski, snowboard, snowshoe or snowmobile up in Whistler, or enjoy the beautiful sunshine in the outer lying islands in Sunshine Coast. Travel insurance is recommended for all.

As we know, government health care plans don’t travel with us when travelling outside of home province, territory or country. Our travel insurance offered by TIC bridges that gap in coverage to help you stay protected during a medical emergency. It is ideal for travellers covered under a Canadian government health insurance plan; Canadians of any age travelling for business or pleasure; or for Canadians travelling within Canada, to the United States or around the world.

TIC’s plan rates are determined by a number of factors, including the plan you choose, your destination and the length of your trip. They also provide multi-trip travel insurance, with baggage lost coverage, accidental death & disablement, flight accidents, trip interruption or rental car collision protection coverage.

Basic Rates:
For worldwide destinations including USA:  starting $2.40 per day.
For worldwide destinations excluding USA:  starting $2.16 per day.
For travel insurance within Canada only:  starting $1.20 per day.

For more information on travel insurance, visit us at www.biis.ca or call 1-888-267-4461. Our staff would be pleased to answer all your inquiries.

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Friday, March 22, 2013

All you need about wise travelling


It is spring break now and Easter is approaching soon, here are a few tips to keep in mind if you’re travelling abroad during your holiday vacations.

1. Book last-minute
It’s advisable to book flights between 60 and 90 days before an anticipated date of departure. That ideal time-frame has now passed, leaving many fliers scrambling to find holiday fare deals. But all is not lost! Data shows that airlines this year were perhaps a bit too aggressive with pricing early on, leaving seats still to be filled. Lucky for procrastinator, flash sales are popping up left and right and the best is possibly yet to come. Start scanning various travel websites now, as early December bookers could save the most on holiday flights. 

2. Shop online
In an era of ever-increasing baggage fees, it’s best to show up at the airport with as little to check in as possible. Lucky for those with long wish lists, nearly everything nowadays can be found — and shipped — thanks to the glorious Internet. So it’s best if you travel light minus gifts, it also means less to get through security and less on your credit card.

3. Ship gifts
If you've found a gift at a great rate or a specialty item during your holiday shopping sprees, then of course seize the deal. But if it doesn't fit in your carry-on, you may want to ship it via a courier company. Do the math a week before to see what will cost you less: a tracked package or an extra bag. If it’s the latter, remember to leave your gifts unwrapped so security can easily access the contents.

4. Save the air miles
Miles get tricky around holidays, especially since Low Points seats for the most popular travel dates sell out very fast. There’s that, plus some airlines implement the never-popular blackout dates. Accumulated miles, whether through an airline or a credit card, are used most economically either when travel plans are booked early or travelers have flexibility with their itinerary. Keep in mind — save the points during holidays unless you snag a great deal.

5. Purchase a hand sanitizers
The most wonderful time of the year is also the most stiffly time of the year for many travelers  Keep that in mind before you head for the airport, and pack plenty of hand sanitizers to help fend off germs. There’s nothing worse than realizing during ascent that you’re stuck in a cabin full of recycled air with a sickly seatmate. Fill your prescriptions, drink lots of water, and wash your hands often— whatever it takes to guarantee your holidays will be spent both joyfully and in healthy way. 

6. Plan ahead and expect delays
Flight delays are pretty much a guarantee this time of the year, whether it’s crowded airports, bad weather or mechanical problems causing them. There’s a way to plan ahead so that getting stuck behind infrequent fliers and families at airport security doesn't cause anxiety. First, avoid connections if you can when booking, even if it means paying a little more. If a connection is a must, then ensure there’s a long enough layover in case your first flight is late to land. On the day of travel, get to the airport earlier, way earlier than you typically would. Worst-case scenario: You spend extra time with your Kindle at the departure gate or relaxing at the airport bar or can go shopping for light items like book or a a nice travel magazine. It’s also advisable to carry a good quality map along with you, and study it carefully, so at least you get an idea of the place you’re visiting.

7. Pack an empty suitcase
If the price is right, bringing an extra piece of luggage on your trip can be a frugal decision. Then, when it comes time to transporting the gifts you've received home, you’ll have an empty suitcase to fill. Either pack fold-up duffel in your luggage or bring a separate bag if it means you won’t get hit with high-priced baggage fees. First, calculate what it will cost to ship your gifts home, then plan and pack accordingly.

8.  Get travel medical insurance with adequate coverage
Insurers vary in their definitions and conditions of coverage. So read the summary of benefits; the limitations and exclusions; and some of the key definitions. Understand what you are buying. The peace of mind is worth it.

For more information on travel insurance, visit us at www.biis.ca or call 1-888-267-4461.

     

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

A Claim Situation



A 13-year-old girl from Korea was visiting her aunt and uncle in Canada when she developed acute abdominal pain. She was rushed to the hospital and underwent an emergency appendectomy. A few days later, she underwent a second operation because of a severe infection. She spent a total of 18 days in the hospital. Without insurance, her out-of pocket cost would have been $77,429.

Insurers vary in their definitions and conditions of coverage. So read the summary of benefits; the limitations and exclusions; and some of the key definitions. Understand what you are buying. The peace of mind is worth it. 

For more information on travel insurance visit us at www.biis.ca or call 1-888-267-4461.

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Monday, March 11, 2013

Without travel insurance could ruin your vacation plans


As we know, spring break is almost here and thousands of families will either be going to travel in inner part of British Columbia or heading south to the States for travel. Lots of visitors may also be planning to come to enjoy the beautiful sunshine in Canada. 

According to the latest travel report from TD Bank, over half of all British Columbians say they never buy travel insurance.

It came to us that most people might not realize MSP benefits are limited outside BC, and in fact one night in an American hospital could cost up to $10,000.

Basic travel medial insurance usually includes things like hospital accommodations, physicians bills, diagnostic tests, lab cost, prescriptions, and private duty nurses would be included. However, when buying insurance make sure you disclose any pre-existing conditions, and read all the fine details in the coverage summary, or otherwise your claims might be questioned or get rejected by some insurance companies.

There are some useful tips which can help to reduce risks when you are travelling within or outside Canada.

1.       Make sure you have enough travel insurance – Dealing with a bad bout of food poisoning, a broken leg, or a deep cut is tough enough to deal with at home, but it becomes even more complicated in a different country. The average out-of-country in-hospital bill can cost up to $10,000 per day, but most provinces will pay less than 10 per cent of that.  Look for a policy that provides a minimum of $1 million of emergency medical coverage, offers 24/7 assistance and covers emergency transportation.

2.       Don’t assume your insurance covers everything – Ensure you understand what you’re covered for, especially when it comes to pre-existing conditions and limitations. If you’ve had a visit to the hospital or switched medications in the past six months, be sure to check in with your insurance provider. For more adventurous activities like hang-gliding or parasailing, you may also need supplementary. Don’t forget to check government travel advisories too before you take off, because serious warnings may void your policy.

3.      Keep updated with travellers news and be careful with fraud while travelling – Just because you’re on vacation doesn’t mean fraudsters are. Stumbling upon free internet may seem like a stroke of luck but be wary. Over one-third of British Columbians (38 per cent) admit they have performed online financial transactions or sent e-mails with sensitive information over public Wi-Fi or on public computers while travelling. This can leave you at risk to identity theft. Be vigilant by only using secure networks. For extra protection, consider identity theft insurance, which covers financial losses and provides an expert to work on your behalf to restore your reputation if you fall victim.


Bridges International Insurance Services
Suite 901- 1030 West Georgia Street, Vancouver BC V6E 2Y3
1-888-267-4461/ 1-604-408-8695 ext 106
info@biis.ca (www.biis.ca)

Like Bridges International Insurance Service's fan page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for exciting news updates and promotions! Also head over to our Visitors to Canada Blog or Canadian Travel Insurance and Trip Cancellation Insurance to read posts about information for working holidays or check out our exciting travel insurance videos on our YouTube Channel.

Friday, March 8, 2013

CIBC Poll: Canadians spending an average of about $2600 on their March vacations this year


Poll conducted by Harris/Decima reveals 12 per cent of Canadians are escaping the weather for a vacation this March, spending an average of about $2,600 to get away. As Canadians look to enjoy their time away, their top travel concerns include illness, or losing their debit and credit cards.
Highlights of the poll include:
·         12 per cent of Canadians say they are planning a March vacation, with an average cost of $2,665.
·         Among Canadians travelling for a vacation this March, 41 per cent are vacationing in Canada, with 36 per centtravelling to the U.S.
·         Residents of Manitoba and Saskatchewan plan to spend the most on average (almost $3,200) and those inAtlantic Canada plan to spend the least (about $1,550).
·         Residents in Alberta (17 per cent) and B.C. (16 per cent) were among the most likely to travel this March, withAtlantic Canada (4 per cent) and Quebec (8 per cent) among the least likely.
"March is a special time of year for Canadians to take a break from school and work and enjoy some time with their families," said Cheryl Longo, Executive Vice President, Card Products, CIBC. "Finding the time and money for family vacations can sometimes be a challenge, and when Canadians do get away they want to enjoy the experience and know they planned well, budgeted well, and are protected in the event of the unexpected."
KEY POLL FINDINGS
Percentage of Canadians who are travelling on vacation for March/Spring Break, by region:
National    

12%
Atlantic Canada   

4%
Quebec    

8%
Ontario    

13%
Manitoba and Saskatchewan 

11%
Alberta     

17%
British Columbia   

16%
Average amount Canadians who are travelling say they will spend in total on their vacations, by region:
National    

$2665
Atlantic Canada   

$1554
Quebec    

$1938
Ontario    

$2931
Manitoba and Saskatchewan  

$3178
Alberta     

$2857
British Columbia   

$2490

Canadians' top concern when travelling:
Someone gets sick or injured on our vacation   

36%
We lose our money or credit cards

18%
We overspend on our vacation     

12%
Our flight is delayed or cancelled because of bad weather

11%
Our luggage is lost   

6%
Our travel plans need to be cancelled before our vacation  

6%
Our travel plans get interrupted during our vacation   

4%



Bridges International Insurance Services
Suite 901- 1030 West Georgia Street, Vancouver BC V6E 2Y3
info@biis.ca
www.biis.ca


Like Bridges International Insurance Service's fan page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for exciting news updates and promotions! Also head over to our Visitors to Canada Blog or Canadian Travel Insurance and Trip Cancellation Insurance to read posts about information for working holidays or check out our exciting travel insurance videos on our YouTube Channel.